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seemed quite comfortable of sending the economy over the fiscal cliff. two weeks ago we had a very productive conversation at the white house. but based on where we stand today, i would say two things. first, despite the claims that the president supports a balanced approach, the democrats have yet to get serious about real spending cuts. secondly, no substantive progress has been made in the talks between the white house and the house over the last two weeks. listen, this is not a game. jobs are on the line. the american economy is on the line. and this is a moment for adult leadership. campaign style rallies and one-sided leaks in the press are not the way to get things done here in washington. majority leader and i just had a meeting with the treasury secretary. it was frank. and it was direct. i was hopeful we'd see a specific plan for cutting spending. we sought to find out today what the president really is willing to do. listen, i remain hopeful that productive conversations can be had in the days ahead. the white house has to get serious. yesterday our leadership team met w
the fiscal cliff could cause major problems for state economies. which face the biggest threat from the potential tax hikes? joining us on the phone is laura porter, managing director at the public finance department, sector head for the state ratings group which focuses on state credits across the country. and focuses on a report, laura, looking granularly at this. good morning. >> good morning. thanks for having me. >> in general, you argue that a lot of ratings on the state front will remain unchanged no matter what. why is that? >> we feel states are fundamentally very strong credits, have strong control over their revenues and spending and the vast majority have shown the ability and willingness to adjust. so we think that the biggest and immediate threat is the fiscal cliff and what that can mean for state revenues, which quickly react to changing economy. >> you make the point -- surprise to no one, you have an unusually high degree of uncertainty in this outlook and that's because -- walk us through a scenario. we go over the cliff, and we begin seeing materially lower reven
in gold. i don't know why it would end. i didn't find -- look. maybe you think that we go to fiscal cliff and it's so deflationary that no one wants to own gold. you could argue that this is a return to the great recession. i don't know. in terms of slowdown in the economy and why inflation is dead. inflation would be dealt a mortal blow if there was inflation by going over the fiscal cliff. austerity does not breed inflation. >> do you believe that sandy is a convenient excuse here for these adp numbers? >> i think sandy was terrible. goldman upgrades waste management today. anyone who has ever been to the giant dumps that waste management has, it's where you dump -- dumping is an expensive thing. when you're a contractor and you have to clean up sandy of which there's immense damage, waste management gets a cut of everything. i think sandy is gigantic. the ripples continue to come. i think new york is going to be hurt very badly by sandy. >> let's move onto starbucks. starbucks today brewing more than coffee. world's largest coffee company announcing during investor day today it plans t
fiscal cliff issue that one of the main areas of the economy of really the country that is going to be impacted after january first is donations to charities. i know you have some thoughts about that, about that concern and how we may have to get the message out that this is such an important focus. tell us about that. >> it is a really difficult question. certainly all of us are looking, you know, potentially as a really big thing. i think what are we going to be left with? we have to look at the bigger picture and say if we are investing in some charities we are investing in our community and we are investing in ourselves. i don't want to see that go away. this is making your world a better place for all of us. >> this great group, these are people that volunteer their time, their efforts and really their hearts. it is so uplifting. i know you probably agree. we talk so much about the negative things. what a great story and great positive event. >> it is an honor to have him here on the floor and for the event tonight. thanks so much. still to come the ceo on holiday season sal
leaders are changing their behavior ahead of the f k fiscal cliff, consumers are not. one out of every two households is a customer. that's why it's great gauge of the economy. so far american consumers are still spending away and he says that you can thank at least in part an improving housing market for that. carl? >> all right. thank you very much, becky. great stuff. thank you for sticking around. >> thank you. >> sticking with the cliff, governors are set to meet with president obama and congressional leaders. the meeting coming one day after the white house rejected a republican plan for averting the cliff. chi chief washington correspondent john harwood is outside of the white house this morning. how do business leaders change the equation? >> reporter: the president is trying to orchestrate a consensus behind his approach to deficit reduction. this is a group part of the national governors association executive committee. a diverse group. he carried three states he represents and governors include scott walker, leader of conservative government reform movement going after publi
to avoid the fiscal cliff, carl. >> times a-wastin. with the deadline inching closer what needs to be done to reach an agreement? judd gregg is a former republican senator, governor of new hampshire and co-chair of the campaign to fix the debt as well as a cnbc contributor. i'm glad to say he's at post nine. good to have you back. >> great to be here, carl. >> is the conventional wisdom that the president has won this round correct and is that good if your goal is to get to a deal in the end? >> i think the president clearly has the microphone and he has the election behind him as the winner so he obviously has more cards i believe than the republicans have, but i think speaker boehner has acted very responsibly here, come forward with a very aggressive proposal. he said he's willing to raise revenues so he's moved that needle very considerably. and to me all that needs to be done to get this deal done is for the two of them to get in a room and ask the staff to go to lunch and they work it out, because the parameters of an agreement are pretty clear. >> the speaker has not brought up rate
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6